Let Me Introduce…My Business. With an Intro Packet

Many times we spend so much time and energy on finding clients that we fail to see other equally as important aspects of marketing our small businesses.  One of those aspects is the way we introduce ourselves and our businesses. As a small business owner, you need to separate yourself from all of the other small businesses out there vying for your clients. This means first impressions are crucial, which is why so many ‘experts’ will tell you to polish up your elevator speech.  But if you’re like me, 30 seconds just isn’t long enough to share the things that set us apart from our competitors. Enter the Introductory Packet or Intro Packet for short.

An Intro Packet allows you to give that 30 second speech and then put something in the hands of a potential client that can really sell your services.  You can include things in an intro packet that the potential client wants to know, things that you seldom have time to share and even things you may not always think of at the moment.  Yet these things very well could be the things that set you apart and make you the perfect choice.

Creating an Introductory Packet

It’s entirely possible you have all the components you need to create a packet, you just haven’t thought to pull them all together in one place.  And just what are those components?

  • Your Business Profile: This is your chance to sell yourself. Include your experience, training and expertise. Include any accomplishments as well. For example; I include several books and articles that I’ve written material for or been quoted in.
  • Your Services List: This is pretty self explanatory, however if you offer services that fall into several areas you might think about separating them. Give them their own section or even their own page. Example: My more mainstream virtual assistant services are on one page and my WordPress website services are on another.
  • Pricing or Rates Information: Include not just your rates but any discounts you may give.
  • Your business policies: Policies like communication methods, business hours, late payment policies and the like should be included here.  It gives a potential client a feeling for how you run your business.
  • Client Assessment sheet: This one is optional, but I’ve found it helpful.  Often times a potential client will contact you knowing they need help but not knowing exactly how you can help them. Giving them a checklist that corresponds with your services helps them see clearly just how valuable your services could be to them.

Package these documents together in a .pdf or .pdf portfolio for e-mailing to anyone asking about your business, services or rates.  Have it readily available to e-mail on your computer, or better yet upload it to an online document service like Dropbox so that you can e-mail it from your smartphone, iPad or netbook.  You can also print them out and put them in simple portfolio folders for handing out at networking events or meetings.  Keep some in your car for those times when someone unexpectedly asks about your business.

If you don’t already have all of these items created for your business it’s worth the time to do so because having an introductory packet readily available is going to save you time. This will be especially appreciated when you’ve used it to build your client list and you’re super busy.

A well done introductory packet can help a potential client understand what you do, see just how professional you are and just how you can help them solve their problems.

Want some new ideas regarding introductory packets?  Check out Re-Visited: The Intro Packet

You can get my Introductory Packet here.